What is Moving Meditation?

With so much on my plate lately, I often find myself stressed, anxious and just a bit snippier to my loved ones. Why am I able to be kind and happy with all the strangers and acquaintances I interact with all day, yet when I get home, I am often the grumpy version of myself. I don’t like it and I need to do something about it. In the last few months, I have turned to more personal development, enlisting the amazing power of podcasts. I usually listen to them first thing in the morning, during my along time on my morning walk or run. It has been an incredible way to start my day, providing me with invaluable inspiration to start my day. But the challenge? My mind is never quiet. I realize that I never sit and think anymore. I am never bored and allow myself to be creative. Oftentimes a slave to all the responsibilities of life and even my iPhone, I never sit still. This may be the problem. I need to slow down and be more mindful of my actions and thoughts. If you’ve read this blog for any period of time, you can probably tell I am an action-oriented person (most mom’s have to be), and I rarely quiet my mind. More and more friends, colleagues and coaches are encouraging me to meditate. I can’t even imagine sitting down to meditate. Or settling my mind long enough to enjoy it. And then I heard the phrase ‘moving meditation.’ Wait. What’s that? What is moving meditation?? I bet I can do that!!

What is moving meditation?

According to the Omega Institute in Rhinehart, NY, “moving meditation allows you to turn any form of conscious movement into a sacred body prayer.” This can be in the form of walking, yoga, tai chi, qigong or even dance. Many turn to moving meditation because they are intimidated or overwhelmed with the idea of quietening the mind without a physical movement. Maybe you don’t have the time to sit and meditate for long periods of time – moving meditation is the answer.

How do you start with moving meditation?

The key to moving meditation – the motion has to be repetitive. That repetitive motion, whether its going for a walk or performing a yoga sequence, will allow anyone to focus on the movement, and let the minds go.

If you belong to a gym, start with a yoga class. This is a great guided sequence of poses that will turn ¬†your focus in ward quickly, particularly when you get to the final resting pose, or svasana. If you are able to quieten your mind during these last 5-10 minutes of class, you will find a few moments to let go. Let’s just say – I love svasana!

Bird_Dogs

Bird_Dogs

If you don’t belong to a gym, look for community tai chi, qigong or dance classes in a MeetUp group. Or even at a community center. Some of these classes may even be free or negligible. These are perfect opportunities to focus on mindfulness in a group or if you prefer a social setting.

Qigong

Qigong

If you need to keep it super simple, walking meditation is the most cost effective. You can do it anywhere and free of charge! This one seems more my speed, so let me share with you the basic steps of moving meditation:

  1. Start at one end of the room – Walk in circles or even walk back and forth in the same area.
  2. Move slowly and naturally – Don’t overthink it, just flow. Move at a speed that is comfortable for you.
  3. Be aware – Focus on some aspect of your body or surroundings during walking meditation. This focus will allow you to apply your brain power later in the day to other area.
  4. Keep the cycle going – Focus on the repetitive aspect of the motion, this will help you let go.
  5. Take notes on any thoughts that come to mind – Don’t beat yourself up if your mind wanders to your to-do list. Just move on quickly and let that thought go.
  6. End when you are ready – There is not time limit or preference. What works for you is the right amount of time.

Have you thought about moving meditation? Something to quieten your mind? What has worked for you? Please comment below and register with us for more tips on how to be more fit from the inside-out!

References:

WikiHow

Omega Institute

One thought on “What is Moving Meditation?

  1. Thank you for sharing. I haven’t tried tai chi or any of the techniques mentioned, but I always find yoga can be meditative. I find myself very aligned with my body and breath, often forgetting what has troubled me before I stepped on the mat. Thank you for creating awareness, I am pinning this post.

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